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Podiatrist in Escondido, CA

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The North County Foot and Ankle Difference

What makes North County Foot and Ankle stand out from other foot and ankle doctors in Escondido? Unlike some foot doctors, our podiatrists work with a client-first mentality. When you walk through our front doors, the time you spend in our office is all about you. We believe in a strong physician-patient relationship fortified by one-on-one attention and honest communication.

Before offering foot pain treatment options, we perform a thorough evaluation, taking into account your individual needs, goals, and preferences. Once that's done, we'll discuss your treatment options in detail and come to a mutual decision regarding the best treatment plan for you.

Whether you have a minor hangnail or need complex surgery, you will receive the same level of compassionate care from our medical team. As board-certified podiatrists in Escondido, our doctors are proud to treat you. You can rest easy knowing they will take the time to explain what's causing your foot pain, what treatments are best suited to your problem, and what steps you should take after treatment.

And while our podiatrists are uniquely qualified to perform surgery, we often recommend non-surgical options, using treatments like orthotics to relieve foot, arch, and heel pain. From sports injuries and bunions to gout and blisters, we're here to help you live life to the fullest without nagging, debilitating foot pain.

 Ankle Specialist Escondido, CA

Patients visit our foot clinic in Escondido, CA, for many podiatric problems, including:

  • Sports Injuries
  • Ingrown Toenails
  • Bunions
  • Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy
  • Plantar Fasciitis
  • General Ankle Pain
  • Sprains
  • Fractures
  • Flat Feet
  • Hammertoes
  • Gout
  • Foot and Ankle Rheumatoid Arthritis

If you're dealing with chronic foot pain or are concerned about a long-lasting symptom that affects your daily life, we're here to help. Unsure if you need to call to make an appointment? These symptoms are often signs that you might need to visit our foot and ankle doctors:

 Foot And Ankle Specialist Escondido, CA

Bunion Pain Solutions

Jason Morris, a board-certified podiatric foot surgeon in Escondido, CA, is one of the top podiatrists in the greater San Diego area and has successfully treated patients with bunions for over ten years. He offers advanced treatments for bunion pain, such as:

 Podiatrist Escondido, CA
Customized Orthotics for Bunion Treatment

Our hand-made orthotics, which are worn in your shoes, are molded to fit your foot exactly, correcting bone misalignments and relieving pain much better than cookie-cutter, store-bought options.

 Foot Surgeon Escondido, CA
Bunion Surgery

Drs. Morris and Redkar performs state-of-the-art triplanar correction surgery using 3-D digital imaging and a minimal incision approach. This procedure is very effective and works by rotating misaligned big toe bones back to the proper position. Once your toe bones are back in position, a metal plate is attached to your bones so that they remain aligned over long-term use.

 Foot Clinic Escondido, CA
Combined Bunion Treatment

Drs. Morris and Redkar may recommend both surgery and custom orthotics to keep your foot pain-free and your bunion from growing back.

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Meet Our World-Class Podiatrists

If you’ve been enduring foot or ankle pain that affects your mobility and quality of life, why not make a change for the better? At North County Foot & Ankle Specialists, our podiatrists in Escondido help patients of all ages. Drs. Morris and Redkar take a patient-first approach with all of our podiatry services. Both are highly qualified and recipients of prestigious awards.

Dr. Avanti Redkar
Dr. Avanti Redkar, DPM

Featured in Los Angeles Magazine’s prestigious Top Doctors list of 2021, Dr. Avanti Redkar is a board-certified podiatrist that specializes in foot and ankle pathology. Dr. Redkar earned her undergrad degree in biology at the University of Scranton and her master’s degree in nutrition at SUNY Buffalo. She attended podiatry school at the New York College of Podiatric Medicine. Her three-year surgical residency at Good Samaritan Hospital in West Islip, New York, included foot and rearfoot surgery, wound care, and hyperbaric medicine training. Dr. Redkar also completed a one-year fellowship in sports medicine and ankle reconstruction.

Dr. Jason Morris
Dr. Jason Morris, DPM

After a rigorous three-year residency at the University of Pittsburgh, Jason Morris, DPM, moved to sunny California to practice podiatric medicine. Once there, Dr. Morris worked as an attending physician at UCLA Medical Center and Cedars Sinai Hospital in Los Angeles. Since relocating to the Escondido area, he has been a staff physician at Palomar Medical Center in Escondido and Poway. Dr. Morris is a podiatric foot and ankle specialist with board certification in rearfoot and forefoot reconstructive surgery. Dr. Morris has undergone extensive training in sports medicine, ankle trauma, diabetic limb salvage, and reconstructive surgery.

Do Away with Foot and Ankle Pain Today

If you've been enduring foot or ankle pain that affects your mobility and quality of life, why not make a change for the better? At North County Foot & Ankle Specialists, our podiatrists in Escondido help patients of all ages. Drs. Morris and Redkar take a patient-first approach with all of our podiatry services. From minor bunion treatments to complex issues like foot fractures, every treatment option we consider is chosen with your best interest in mind.

Our podiatrists are members of several professional organizations, including:

  • The American Podiatric Medical Association
  • The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons
  • The American Board of Podiatric Medicine

If more conservative treatments are better for your condition, non-surgical solutions like custom orthotics may be the best route. If you need ankle or foot surgery, our podiatrists will complete your procedure with time-tested skill and precision. Because, at the end of the day, our goal is to provide you with the most effective foot and ankle pain solutions with the quickest recovery options available.

Contact us online or via phone today to schedule an appointment at our Escondido office. By tomorrow, you'll be one step closer to loving life without foot or ankle pain.

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Latest News in Escondido, CA

Escondido artist, born and raised in Ukraine, shares her style with adopted new home

Anna Pearson is a Ukrainian-born artist who moved to San Diego in 2017, and currently has work on display in San Diego, including a 600-square-foot, black-and-white floral mural in the North City development in San MarcosFrom the time she danced along to “Hotel California” with a classmate, artist Anna Pearson knew that she wanted to come to America, specifically California. She left her native Ukraine and arrived in the United States in 2017 for a chance to pivot and live out her dreams.“From the start, I t...

Anna Pearson is a Ukrainian-born artist who moved to San Diego in 2017, and currently has work on display in San Diego, including a 600-square-foot, black-and-white floral mural in the North City development in San Marcos

From the time she danced along to “Hotel California” with a classmate, artist Anna Pearson knew that she wanted to come to America, specifically California. She left her native Ukraine and arrived in the United States in 2017 for a chance to pivot and live out her dreams.

“From the start, I treated this as a big adventure. It wasn’t a means to an end, for me, so adjusting was rather easy and exciting,” she says of living in a new country. “Every day (in San Diego) is like being on vacation. Every time I feel a bit down, all I need is to just go outside. First thing I thought after arriving was that people here are probably never depressed. How can they be with all this sunshine, the beach, and flowers all year round? ... After a while, you kind of get used to all that, though, and start noticing other things like traffic or the cost of living, but I never take San Diego perks for granted, and try to find time to appreciate what surrounds me.”

She started out writing and creating other content for local companies, and made an Instagram page for her art that would also allow her to work on her English and connect with other artists in the area. That eventually led to exposure for her work as a painter and muralist, which can be seen in one of her recent projects, a 600-square-foot, black-and-white mural at North City, a mixed-use development in San Marcos.

Pearson, 38, lives in Escondido with her partner and her daughter, and took some time to talk about her life in Ukraine, her artwork, and the kindness and warmth she’s found in San Diego County.

Q: You were born and raised in Poltava, Ukraine. How would you describe the city and its culture? What are some of your fondest memories of your hometown?

A: My hometown is a small city in central Ukraine with old history and traditions. It’s considered the cradle of the purest Ukrainian language, not affected by other languages’ influence even though it was massively altered during the Russian colonization period. It’s the birthplace of many Ukrainian literature giants and some amazing artists, as well. One of the fondest memories I have is long walks I’d take in the old chestnut alley during warm, late spring nights when the air is so warm and alive that it feels like kisses on your face, and giant chestnut trees blooms that look like chandeliers are so solemn in the shaking light of street lanterns that it almost feels like you are walking through ancient temple.

Q: You mentioned that you graduated from V.N. Karazin Kharkiv National University, the second oldest university, in Ukraine and that it was hit by Russian missiles during the early days of the war this year. What was your experience at university? And what is the significance of its damage, to you as an alum and Ukrainian?

A: When I learned that one of the buildings of my university was hit, my heart sank. That was not a building that was destroyed, it was my young, carefree, happy years that crumbled with it. That’s how it felt. Like the dirty rubber boot stomping your precious, most treasured memories. Karazin University is a breathing history and one of Kharkiv’s landmarks. I had so many happy moments in that city: my first love, best friends, first kiss, first job, so many things I treasure.

What I love about Escondido...

I live in the most amazing community where people still know their neighbors’ names and look after each other. On any given day, I can ask the neighbors in a Facebook group for literally anything and a few minutes after, someone will respond offering the exact thing I asked for and some help along with it.

Q: Do you find your perspective on the current conflict showing up in your artwork at all?

A: First of all, can we please not call it a “conflict”? It degrades the scale of tragedy and the genocide of Ukrainian people. A conflict is a quarrel with a husband in a kitchen over unwashed dishes. Let’s call things by their names: what’s going on in Ukraine is a full-scale war.

War affects every second of my existence. The moment I wake up, I check news about new attacks, and feel relieved and selfish seeing that it wasn’t my city this time. First month, I was paralyzed and couldn’t do anything but cry. Then, there were a few residential murals that literally saved me; I had to pull myself together, go meet with the clients, and immerse myself in a creative process. Art was always therapeutic for me, and this time was no exception. I draw black-and-white illustrations to reflect on my feelings because war is black and white. Parallel with that, I painted a few, small acrylic paintings that I never showed anywhere: a lot of texture, wrinkles, paint splashing, and imperfections just like I felt it. They are so personal because they remind me of the darkest time of my life. It would be lovely in the upcoming year to put them all together and find a place to show them to the public. It’s just a thought so far, but I want to put it out in the universe so maybe it’ll come true faster.

Q: How would you currently describe yourself and your work as an artist?

A: I’m still searching, and this search will probably never stop because there are so many wonderful ways to express myself. I like to try new things and media, but what I like the most is painting and drawing, which are, fortunately, also the things I think I do best.

Q: What would you say is your point of view as an artist?

A: Every drawing, every painting or sketch I make is 100 percent about aesthetics, nature, and love. Love to what I do and to life in general. That’s the only point.

Q: What is it about creating murals that you’re drawn to?

A: When I create something on this scale, it feels more valid, important, and so much bigger than me. Even though this kind of art is considered decorative and usually is not permanent, it has a big impact. It’s also the way to connect with the community, to make art more accessible to the masses, to convey a certain message or be a talking point.

Q: Can you walk us through your process for creating a mural? For example, what was your creative process for the North City mural?

A: Usually, any mural starts with the client’s desire for an original work of art and the artist’s idea. When I create a commercial piece, I always consider a client’s specifics: what kind of business or a community this is, or, if it’s a private client, what kind of interests they have. I consider the environment, too, and then sketch some ideas for reviewing. North City was no exception. They have a public art program that highlights local and regional artists, and I was fortunate enough to get on their radar. They inquired about the mural for one of the walls on the property and I started sketching. I tried to guess what they might like and send them some ideas of what I thought they’d wanted; it turned out that what they wanted was me. They wanted my vision and style, my line art and graphic flowers (the things I started on my Instagram), my perception—that’s what they wanted to see, and I pretty much had full creative freedom.

Q: What did you want to convey with that piece?

A: I used stylization as my expressive tool and, through unification and simplified forms, wanted to make people interact with it inside their mind. You see, childish looking flowers allow your imagination to think of them as your favorite flowers and, in each person’s head, it will be different flowers. There’s no straight line in the mural or perfect geometry because life isn’t about perfection. I did use a lot of round shapes as it is the beginning and the end, for me; a perpetually spinning circle of life. Even though the flowers look similar, there’s no one like the other. They are all unique and different, like people in that community, but together they create a beautiful, flourishing environment. Mainly, I wanted for people to have fun because flowers always make you feel better.

Q: What has your work taught you about yourself?

A: That I can do more than I give myself credit for. That I can be brave and fragile at the same time. That I can be an inspiration and help for others while being vulnerable and sensitive.

Q: What is the best advice you’ve ever received?

A: “Things turn out the best for those who make the best out of the way things turn out.” In any situation, I try to find a bright side. Every mistake can be an opportunity and any accident can lead to new open doors.

Q: What is one thing people would be surprised to find out about you?

A: That I have a degree in geography, and I know how to sew and make my own clothes, occasionally. The vest and pants I’m wearing in the photo for this story were made by me.

Q: Please describe your ideal San Diego weekend.

A: To be honest, every day in America’s finest city is ideal, for me. Typically, I’d venture to some cute coffee shop for coffee and people watching, then go for a walk in fancy neighborhoods to look at cool homes, especially if it’s holiday season. I like to observe how different people live, how they dress in different areas, and so on.

Powerful storm leaves San Diego roads drenched in rain with pier-towering surf

Torrential rain returned to San Diego County Thursday for the fifth day as another atmospheric river impacted California.SAN DIEGO — Widespread rain returned to San Diego County Thursday for the fifth day as another atmospheric river impacted our state.Governor Gavin Newsom ...

Torrential rain returned to San Diego County Thursday for the fifth day as another atmospheric river impacted California.

SAN DIEGO — Widespread rain returned to San Diego County Thursday for the fifth day as another atmospheric river impacted our state.

Governor Gavin Newsom proclaimed a state of emergency throughout California in response to severe winter storms.

According to the governor's office, the declaration will bolster emergency response efforts and authorizes the mobilization of the California National Guard for disaster response. It also allowed Caltrans to request immediate assistance from the Federal Highway Administration to expedite road repairs due to the storms.

The heaviest rain was predicted to hit the northern half of California, recovering from heavy rain and snow on New Year's Eve and Day.

Weather models showed widespread, moderate rain expected for most of Thursday.

Flooding was a significant hazard due to an already saturated ground and elevated water levels in flood channels, dry washes, and low water crossings.

Dangerously large breaking waves of 10 to 16 feet were expected.

According to the National Weather Service, minor coastal flooding was expected for the Coastal Flood Advisory.

The surf steadily increased into Thursday afternoon to around 10 feet, then rose to as high as 16 feet early Friday morning.

Everyone was asked to remain out of the water due to life-threatening surf conditions.

The San Diego Fire-Rescue Lifeguard Division increased staffing for Thursday and Friday in advance of severe weather conditions and offered the following tips:

San Diego prepared for stormy weather Thursday, and leaders encouraged area residents to take proactive steps to prevent flooding.

According to the city, the Stormwater Department will be temporarily placing "no parking" signs in low-lying or flood-risk areas, cleaning storm drains and inlets with a history of debris buildup, street sweeping to reduce trash and pollutants from entering our waterways, and monitoring more than 46,000 storm drains citywide for any issues.

On an individual level, city and county residents can assist by:

Additionally, sandbags are limited and can be picked up at nine recreation centers in each San Diego City Council District. Residents with identification showing proof of residency can receive up to 10 empty sandbags.

As the sandbags are not pre-filled, residents are also encouraged to plan to buy sand at local hardware stores, landscape suppliers, or wherever else sand can be purchased.

The locations to pick up sandbags are Standley Recreation Center, Robb Athletic Field, Golden Hill Recreation Center, Martin Luther King, Jr. Recreation Center, Scripps Ranch Recreation Center, North Clairemont Recreation Center, Allied Gardens Recreation Center, San Ysidro Community Activity Center and City Heights Recreation Center.

During the rain, the city's storm patrol crews monitor areas and respond to incidents, such as temporary flooding and downed trees or branches.

Residents can report events, such as flooding or downed trees, using the Get It Done application or calling 619-527-7500. If it is a life-threatening emergency, call 911.

Coastal Flood Advisory | San Diego County, coastal areas: Noon Thursday – 6:00 p.m., Friday.

High Surf Warning | San Diego County coastal areas: Noon Thursday – 6:00 p.m., Friday.

Wind Advisory | San Diego County mountains, inland valleys, coastal areas:2:00 a.m. Thursday – noon, Thursday.

For more information on preparing for a storm and what to do during and after the rain, click here to be taken to the City of San Diego’s Storm Preparedness website.

Bags Only

WATCH RELATED: Strong Pacific storm brings heavy rain, wind and accidents to San Diego

Utilities Net Metering 3.0 Impact on California Solar

In the past we have talked about how some states have tried to prevent the average citizen from getting solar on their homes, but not California. Think again. This fall, the utilities presented a formidable proposal to the California Public Utilities Commission. The solar industry fought hard with demonstrations, phone calls and emails to PCUC and Governor Newsom. Thankfully, the utilities didn’t get everything they were asking for, but the CPUC passed a proposal that could put many solar companies out of business. 2023 is going to be ...

In the past we have talked about how some states have tried to prevent the average citizen from getting solar on their homes, but not California. Think again. This fall, the utilities presented a formidable proposal to the California Public Utilities Commission. The solar industry fought hard with demonstrations, phone calls and emails to PCUC and Governor Newsom. Thankfully, the utilities didn’t get everything they were asking for, but the CPUC passed a proposal that could put many solar companies out of business. 2023 is going to be a rough year for solar companies, and even strong ones might need to lay off many of their employees.

With California’s goals of being energy independent, this is going to slow down the solar progress of the state. CPUC, along with the utilities, is making it more difficult for the average citizen to benefit from having solar energy. Of course, there are going to be solar farms going up, but using all the empty roofs would be much easier on the environment. Also, the solar is being produced where it is being utilized. With solar farms, the energy will have to be transported on electric lines from distant places. Then charge the extra expense to those low-income users they seem so worried about. So, what are we dealing with and what will be the solar companies’ next move?

Solar owners produce more kWh during the day than they can use. They are currently hooked up to the utilities with Net Metering 2.0 (NEM 2.0), and the extra energy they produce goes back to the utility grid. The solar system shuts down at dusk and then they use energy from the grid. The utilities credit the home or business owners the same amount that they are charged, around $.30/kWh. Those under NEM 1.0 and NEM 2.0 are grandfathered in for 20 years from the date of purchase.

On December 15, 2022, the CPUC voted to change that. With NEM 3.0, instead of being credited with $.30/kWh, they will be credited with only $.08/kWh when they use it back. This results in a lower financial gain for the solar customer. The only way to offset this loss is to install storage batteries, so no extra solar goes on the utilities grid, but rather stores in the batteries. That way when the sun goes down and the solar shuts off, the home or business can run off of the battery. This will add to the price of the solar system, but here at Cosmic Solar we have daily requests for battery storage because it also gives you protection during power failures. Unfortunately, it will lengthen the payback years for the purchase of the system, but it will mitigate the financial loss with NEM 3.0.

Solar.com estimates a monthly bill of $250 will be reduced to $18 per month with solar under Net Metering 2.0. Under NEM 3.0 that will increase to $95, which is still a saving of $155, and batteries would take it back down to $18. A lifetime saving of $110,000 would become around $75,000. It is still saving but less than before.

The good news is that NEM 3.0 does not go into effect until April 13th, so if Californians get their solar applications submitted as soon as possible it will grandfather them into Net Metering 2.0 for twenty years. For those Californians who want to do solar, better sooner than later. The utilities are offering an incentive for battery storage by allowing customers to add batteries later without being bumped up to NEM 3.0. Whether battery storage is done up front or later, it increases the value of pairing battery storage with solar.

Our Cosmic Solar & Roofing staff is on hand to submit interconnection paperwork immediately after the sale to ensure we can grandfather as many people as possible in to NEM 2.0 before April. If you want to install a solar system, call Cosmic Solar & Roofing right away at 760-749-1111 or go: www.cosmicsolar.com.

Judith Shadzi, Vice President of Cosmic Solar & Roofing, Inc

Governor candidate visits Escondido: wants Californians to ‘live, work and breathe again’

Gubernatorial candidate Jenny Rae Le Roux Thursday dropped by the Escondido Chamber of Commerce for an interview with The Times-Advocate...

Last week, I sent a letter to Governor Newsom and the California Public Utilities Commission to immediately implement measures to...

Senator Brian Jones of the 38th District dropped by Escondido this week on a wide-ranging tour of his district....

North County Housing Project Halted, Harmony Grove Permits Rescinded

A unanimous vote ended the contested housing project near Escondido and the Elfin Forest Recreational Reserve that began in 2018.ESCONDIDO, CA — County supervisors voted unanimously Wednesday to rescind the permits for a contested housing project near Escondido and the Elfin Forest Recreation Reserve.A previous board in July 2018 approved the Harmony Grove Village South proposal, which involved rezoning land near the intersection of Harmony Grove Road and Country Club Drive.Along with the General Plan amendment t...

A unanimous vote ended the contested housing project near Escondido and the Elfin Forest Recreational Reserve that began in 2018.

ESCONDIDO, CA — County supervisors voted unanimously Wednesday to rescind the permits for a contested housing project near Escondido and the Elfin Forest Recreation Reserve.

A previous board in July 2018 approved the Harmony Grove Village South proposal, which involved rezoning land near the intersection of Harmony Grove Road and Country Club Drive.

Along with the General Plan amendment that originally cleared the way for the project, supervisors also voted Wednesday to rescind the rezoning designation, specific plan, major use permit, environmental impact report and site plan.

The project was planned on 111 acres between Escondido and the city of San Marcos. It would have included 453 single-family and multi-family homes, 5,000 square feet of commercial or civic uses, 4 acres of private and public parks, multi-use trails and 35 acres of biological open space, according to the county.

In August 2018, the Sierra Club, Elfin Forest Harmony Grove Town Council, Endangered Habitats League and the Cleveland National Forest Foundation filed a lawsuit challenging the project, claiming it violated the California Environmental Quality Act.

In February 2020, a trial court sided with the plaintiffs. According the county, the court ruled that the project also had numerous drawbacks, including inadequate greenhouse mitigation measures and air quality analysis.

The project was inconsistent with the San Diego Association of Governments' Regional Plan, the county's General Plan on affordable housing and a community plan policy requiring septic tanks, according to the court ruling.

On Oct. 14, 2021, an appeals court affirmed the trial court's ruling. In October, the trial court issued a revised order requiring the county to rescind all Harmony Grove project approvals within 60 days.

During a public comment period Wednesday, J.P. Theberge of the Elfin Forest Harmony Grove Town Council said the previous Board of Supervisors didn't take community concerns about wildfire risks seriously.

"The era of sprawl developing in fire-prone areas is over," Theberge said, adding that he and other area residents have started a nonprofit that focuses on contested development projects.

Kelvin Barrios, of the Laborers Union Local 89, urged supervisors to let the project go forward.

"We have an agreement, they're working with local labor," he said. "We want to see this project done."

Supervisor Jim Desmond was absent Wednesday, and his office didn't provide a formal reason. Wednesday's regular meeting, which focuses on land-use and environmental issues, was the last for 2022.

Stone Ruination IPA Returns

ESCONDIDO, California – At long last, ‘the liquid poem to the glory of the hop’ returns. Stone Ruination IPA is now available as the first in Stone’s 2023 series of Fan Favorite Returns. This is the original recipe with its most ruinous qualities, just as intended when it first wrecked palates in 2002.For most, Stone Ruination IPA is the quintessential representation of a West Coast Double IPA. The aroma is piney and resinous thanks to a barrage of hops. The first sip is a vibrant blast of citr...

ESCONDIDO, California – At long last, ‘the liquid poem to the glory of the hop’ returns. Stone Ruination IPA is now available as the first in Stone’s 2023 series of Fan Favorite Returns. This is the original recipe with its most ruinous qualities, just as intended when it first wrecked palates in 2002.

For most, Stone Ruination IPA is the quintessential representation of a West Coast Double IPA. The aroma is piney and resinous thanks to a barrage of hops. The first sip is a vibrant blast of citrusy bitterness with a light malt balance.

This particular beer has a notable history that plays an important role in Stone’s reputation today. It’s the BIG brother of Stone IPA, which was Stone’s 1st Anniversary IPA. The team had been steadily bumping up the hop levels of its anniversary releases every year, but after the massively hoppy Stone 5th Anniversary IPA, adding any more hops would have been, well, ruinous. So, the team brought out a year-round release that would pay homage to the indelicate hop glory of Stone’s first 5 years. In 2002, Stone Ruination IPA became the first full time brewed and bottled West Coast style Double IPA on the planet. In effect, it quickly became the most widely available example of the style. At the time it was an attack on the palate, quite literally off the bitterness charts.

“The original Stone Ruination IPA was in our year-round lineup for 13 years,” explained Jeremy Moynier, Stone Brewing Senior Manager of Brewing & Supply Chain. “It’s seen a couple different recipe iterations, but this is the first time since 2015 that we’ve brewed the OG. I love the intense bitterness and the flavor and aroma. That’s a classic trio of hops: Magnum, Chinook, and Centennial. This beer defined the West Coast Double IPA style for me, and now with so many expressions of Double IPAs out there, it’s amazing to revisit such a classic beer.”

Stone Ruination IPA is the first release in Stone’s 2023 Fan Favorite Returns. The series is a lineup of limited release beers that have become signatures of the brewery’s prolific 26-year history. This year’s favorites include:

Stone Ruination IPA is now available in all its bitter hop glory nationwide in 12oz six-pack cans, 22oz bottles and draft.

QUICK FACTS

Proper Name: Stone Ruination IPA

ABV: 8.2%

IBUs: 100+

Hops: Magnum, Chinook, Centennial

Availability: Nationwide for a limited time

Packaging: 12oz six-pack cans, 22oz bottles & draft

Originally Released: 2002 – 2015

STONE DELICIOUS IPA TASTING NOTES

Appearance: Pours a clear, deep golden color with a white head.

Aroma: Piney and resin with citrus-like, fruity cereal notes.

Taste: Intense resiny hop flavors with a light malt balance, a touch of alcohol warmth, and a strong, long-lasting bitterness on the finish.

Palate: Medium-full body with no perceptible sweetness and an intense bitterness throughout the palate.

ABOUT STONE BREWING COMPANY

Founded in 1996, Stone pioneered the West Coast Style IPA, helping to fuel the modern craft beer revolution and inspire generations of hop fanatics. Today Stone operates breweries in Escondido, CA and Richmond, VA plus seven tap room and bistro locations. Stone offers a wide range of craft beers including its most popular Stone IPA, Stone Delicious IPA and Stone Buenaveza Salt & Lime Lager. The company’s long list of environmental efforts includes a LEED Silver Certification, world-class water reclamation and creative uses of spent grain. Stone has been called the “All-time Top Brewery on Planet Earth” by BeerAdvocate magazine twice.

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